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The duties of a U.S. Marshal and a Pennsylvania State Constable are very similar. The Marshal works within the Federal system, whereas the State Constable works within their State system. Both are law enforcement/peace officers of their respective court systems. A Marshal is a federal court official who may serve papers and act as a law enforcement officer in keeping order in court, protecting federal officials, making arrests, or participating in court-ordered police activities. A State Constable does the same within the jurisdiction of their respective State. Each district court has a Federal Marshal and a corps of deputies. They are a law enforcement officer, similar to a Sheriff or Constable, who serves official documents and occasionally assists in police matters as Sheriffs and Constables do on a County and State level.  The U.S. Marshals service was established in 1789.
Marshal
A federal court officer whose job entails maintaining the peace, delivering legal papers, and performing duties similar to those of a state sheriff.
The term marshal originated in Old English Law, where it was used to describe a variety of law enforcement officers with responsibilities to the courts and the king or queen. In contemporary U.S. law, it refers primarily to the chief law officers for the federal courts (28 U.S.C.A. §§ 561 et seq.). U.S. marshals execute federal laws within the states under the instructions of the courts. Their chief duty is to enforce legal orders; they have no independent authority to question whether a judge is right or wrong. Their responsibilities include delivering writs and processes and carrying out other orders, which range from making arrests to holding property in the custody of the court. Marshals may exercise the same powers as a state sheriff or state constable.
The chain of command for U.S. marshals begins in the White House (the chain of command for a state constable begins in the governor’s office). The president appoints to a four-year term one marshal for each judicial district (the People elect a state constable to a six year term for each city, township or ward). Each Marshal’s appointment is subject to confirmation by the U.S. Senate. Once an appointment is confirmed, the president retains the power to remove the marshal at any time. In the Justice Department, the U.S. attorney general designates where each marshal's office is located. Each marshal appoints her or his own deputies and staff, with salaries based on schedules in federal law.
At the state and local levels, the term marshal is also used to describe law enforcement officers whose job is similar to that of a constable or sheriff. 
It is enacted by the act to establish the judicial courts of the United States, 1 Story's L. U. S. 53, as follows: 
     Sec. 27. That a marshal shall be appointed, in and for each district, for the term of four years, but shall be removable from office at pleasure whose duty it shall be to attend the district and circuit courts, when sitting therein, and also the supreme court in the district in which that court shall sit: and to execute throughout the district, all lawful precepts directed to him, and issued under the authority of the United States, and he shall have power to command all necessary assistance in the execution of his duty, and to appoint, as there shall be occasion, one or more deputies, who shall be removable from office by the judge of the district court, or the circuit court sitting within the district, at the pleasure of either. And before he enters on the duties of his office, he shall become bound for the faithful performance of the same, by himself and by his deputies, before the judge of the district court, to the United States jointly and severally, with two good and sufficient sureties, inhabitants and freeholders of such district, to be approved by the district judge, in the sum of twenty thousand dollars, and shall take before said judge, as shall also his deputies, before they enter on the duties of their appointment, the following oath of office: "I, A B, do solemnly swear or affirm, that I will faithfully execute all lawful precepts directed to the marshal of the district of________under the authority of the United States, and true returns make; and in all things well and truly, and without malice or partiality, perform the duties of the office of marshal (or marshal's deputy, as the case may be) of the district of _________ during my continuance in said office, and take only my lawful fees. So help me God." 

     3.-Sec. 28. That in all causes wherein the marshal, or his deputy, shall be a party, the writs and precepts therein shall be directed to such disinterested person, as the court, or any justice or judge thereof may appoint, and the person so appointed is hereby authorized to execute and return the same. 
PENNSYLVANIA STATE CONSTABLE
Pennsylvania's Constables, like Sheriffs, and unlike U.S. Marshals are constitutionally elected peace officers serving as the law enforcement arm of the Commonwealth's Magisterial court system, and the Common Pleas Courts. They are not ‘hired’ by a bureaucrat. Certified Constables have statewide jurisdiction in Pennsylvania and, as sworn law enforcement/peace officers with powers throughout the state, are authorized to carry out duties for civil and criminal proceedings, and to arrest for felony crimes or breaches of the peace, either committed in their presence, or by warrant. They are authorized to perform this duty anywhere in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Constables are available to assist the needs of the office of the County Sheriff, as well as local police departments, if so requested. State Constables were established in Pennsylvania in 1664, making Constables Pennsylvania's oldest form of law enforcement officer, and take the following oath of office upon being sworn in as peace officers: 
I (name) do solely swear that I shall support, uphold, and defend the Constitution of the United States, and the Constitution of this Commonwealth, and that I shall faithfully discharge my duties as a Pennsylvania State Constable with fidelity, so help me God. Unlike police officers, or the sheriffs department, Constables are not paid a salary by the state, but rather for each job accepted and completed. Their compensation is a predetermined rate included in courts costs incurred by defendants. Constables cost the taxpayers of Pennsylvania nothing. Pennsylvania Constables were established in Penn’s Woods in 1664, before Pennsylvania, or the United States ever existed.
Certified Constables are empowered to carry out the state's Magisterial court system's business. Some of the ways they do so is by serving arrest warrants, mental health warrants, court summons, complaints and subpoenas. They also transport prisoners, and enforce protection from abuse orders, orders of eviction and judgment levies. Constables are the only law enforcement officials permitted to monitor the polls on election day. It is their duty to ensure that the Constitutional rights of all voters are protected, and that no qualified voter is threatened, intimidated, or impeded from voting. 
Constables are required to attend and pass an 80 hour training in addition to a 40 hour firearm training  curriculum to receive Certification through the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) under Act 44, and to successfully complete 40 hours of annual updates on law and firearms training to maintain their Certification during their term of office. Constables may appoint Deputy Constables to serve at their pleasure.

U.S. Marshal
1) n. a federal court official who may serve papers and act as a law enforcement officer in keeping order in court, protecting federal officials, making arrests, or participating in court-ordered police activities. Each district court has a Federal Marshal and a corps of deputies. 2) in several states, a law enforcement officer, similar to a Sheriff or Constable, who serves official documents and occasionally assists in police matters.
Pennsylvania State Constable
1) n. a state court official who may serve papers and act as a law enforcement officer in keeping order in court, protecting state officials, making arrests, or participating in court-ordered police activities. Each Magisterial court has access to one or more State Constables who may appoint Deputy Constables. 2) in several states, a law enforcement officer, similar to a Sheriff or Marshal, who serves official documents and occasionally assists in police matters.-_PA_State_Constable_Certification.html-_PA_State_Constable_Certification.htmlshapeimage_15_link_0shapeimage_15_link_1
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County Sheriffs and State Constables are the only Constitutionally elected Peace Officers in the United States.


• PCCD
• Chief Law Enfocement Officer
• Federal Agents are not Police Officers
• Arrest Authority of Constables
• PA Fraternal Order of Constables
• Constable Certification
• Constitutional Sheriffs & Peace Officers Association

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/constables%27_education_and_training_board/5386https://www.google.com/search?q=cheif+law+enforcement+officer+in+a+county&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-ahttp://ten8.wordpress.com/2008/12/11/feds-are-not-police-officers/http://ten8.wordpress.com/2008/12/11/pennsylvania-constables-have-significant-arrest-authority/http://pafoc.myfastsite.net/-_PA_State_Constable_Certification.htmlhttp://cspoa.org/http://cspoa.org/shapeimage_22_link_0shapeimage_22_link_1shapeimage_22_link_2shapeimage_22_link_3shapeimage_22_link_4shapeimage_22_link_5shapeimage_22_link_6shapeimage_22_link_7
Federal Agents Are Not Police Officers
 There has been some confusion pertaining to the arrest authority of Federal law enforcement officers in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
 Federal officers, or agents as they are sometimes referred to, are not general police officers and do not possess the authority to to affect warrantless arrests for traffic offenses or for misdemeanor crimes.
 In the case of Commonwealth v. Price, 543 Pa. 403, 672, A. 2d 280 (1996) the court held, citing Section 3052 of Title 18 of the U.S. Code (18 U.S.C. 3052), that Agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are not authorized under either State or Federal law nor under common law to make warrantless arrests for traffic offenses or for misdemeanor crimes. Federal Agents are “authorized to make warrantless arrests only where they have reasonable grounds to believe that the person  has committed or is committing any felony cognizable under the laws of the United States (federal law).
Federal Agents Are Not Police Officers
 There has been some confusion pertaining to the arrest authority of Federal law enforcement officers in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
 Federal officers, or agents as they are sometimes referred to, are not general police officers and do not possess the authority to to affect warrantless arrests for traffic offenses or for misdemeanor crimes.
 In the case of Commonwealth v. Price, 543 Pa. 403, 672, A. 2d 280 (1996) the court held, citing Section 3052 of Title 18 of the U.S. Code (18 U.S.C. 3052), that Agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are not authorized under either State or Federal law nor under common law to make warrantless arrests for traffic offenses or for misdemeanor crimes. Federal Agents are “authorized to make warrantless arrests only where they have reasonable grounds to believe that the person  has committed or is committing any felony cognizable under the laws of the United States (federal law).